Coke 600 Round Up

So this years running of NASCAR’s longest race might not have been one for the highlight reels, but it certainly was one for the record books.

Take away the confusion of the format away from the All Star Race and you’re left with very good racing at Charlotte. Trevor Bayne’s big pass. Larson going wheel to wheel with Chase Elliott. Larson again trying his damnedest to win the whole thing over Logano. The All Star Race is a big ol’ preview of the Coke 600. Always has been.

So we, the collective patrons of NASCAR, expected something similar.

We didn’t get that.

And that’s ok. (Seriously, it really is. The NASCAR Twitternauts need to reign it in)

truex wins coke 600Martin Truex Jr had sheer and utter domination of a single race not seen in over fifteen years. Truex led all but eight laps in a 600 mile race. That’s 588 miles. That’s if I hopped in my car and drove from Rhode Island to the track in Richmond. NASCAR had one of their patented competition cautions early on in the race. Truex had taken off to something like an eight second lead by then. He started from the pole and never looked back.

The official stats say nine lead changes among four drivers but the reality is that those lead changes only happened during green flag pit cycles. Jimmie Johnson, the only driver who could even see Truex’s rear bumper, picked up five laps on two separate cycles that way. Logano one lap. Paul Menard two when he was stretching fuel in case mileage became a thing.

Cautions were minimal. Brian Scott spun and didn’t hit anything. The #32, run by Jeffery Earnhardt again this week, pancaked the wall at one point. Sweet Lady Debris was the only caution past lap 209 of 400. Truex’s pit crew and that number one pit box kept him out front.

There wasn’t a thing anyone could do versus the Furniture Row Toyota. Jimmie Johnson sniffed the lead after the Sweet Lady Debris caution and led maybe a quarter of a lap. But Truex got it back before the lap was complete so it didn’t even count as an official lead change. For much of the race, there were less than five cars within ten seconds time of Truex.

Jeff Burton's Exide colors from 96-01
Jeff Burton’s Exide colors from 96-01

The only race in my memory of watching NASCAR since the late 80s that comes close was Jeff Burton going flag to flag at New Hampshire in 2000. On the Fox broadcast, Mike Joy even dropped that reference and the other two, Jeff Gordon and Darrell Waltrip, were actually in that race. (Tony Stewart was still new back then and Junior was a rookie) Flag to flag is an amazing achievement for any racer but on reflection, I agree with Mike Joy that this was more dominant than Burton was back then. Context is why.

First of all, every race at New Hampshire has been 300 laps (for something like 314 miles because of it’s slightly bigger than 1-mile size). Or 301 because of a thing some sponsor did years ago that sticks sometimes even with a different sponsor. Regardless. It’s about half the race distance. New Hampshire is also notoriously hard to pass at. I have been witness to some amazing races at New Hampshire, but it’s no Bristol. Ryan Newman, who’s rookie season wasn’t for another two years after Burton’s feat, has said in the past that Loudon is “the birthplace of track position.” So take a flat track, add in seven caution flags taking thirteen cars out of the race and that makes for a much different race. Oh, and by the way, that was the year that NASCAR ran restrictor plates at New Hampshire.

Two drivers, Kenny Irwin Jr and Adam Petty, died at New Hampshire within two months earlier that year. It was a quick safety fix until NASCAR made more lasting safety fixes in the wake of Dale Earnhardt’s death less than a year later.

So Burton’s race back in 2000 was an achievement, but the utter domination of Truex is a lasting one for the record books. It should be viewed as one of the greatest team performances in NASCAR history, from Truex wheeling the car to his pit crew keeping him up front.

The only problem here is that people are whining and complaining about the race.

Why? I don’t get it.

I know what the people are saying, I’m not deaf. I’ve watched NASCAR for over 25 years and live tweet as many of the races that I can. I know what the NASCAR Twitternauts are complaining about.

But I don’t think they should.

harvick edwards phoenix finishI have said repeatedly in my commentary this year that NASCAR is being spoiled with epic finishes. The NASCAR media people will be stocked for years with new clips for their promo commercials. The only downside to that is people expect that every race is going to be like that.

Can you honestly tell me that you think every race is going to be like that? If you said “yes” you’re a liar. I’m not even going to say your foolish or naïve, just a liar. NASCAR is no different than any ball-and-stick sport in that aspect. Not ever sporting event will be a classic.

Look at the Super Bowl.

For every Eli to Tyree Helmet Catch (18 and one! Nuts to you Pats fans!) that everyone will remember and be on every highlight reel until the Earth collapses in on itself, there are more Super Bowls that go by the wayside in the collective memory. I remember that the Seahawks beat the Broncos a couple years ago and Peyton had that dumb missed hike to start the game, but how long will a 48-3 beatdown be remembered? Do you remember how Super Bowl XXXV went? I only do because it was my Giants that were on the wrong end of a Baltimore thrashing. So beyond the New York fans wishing they could forget and the Baltimore fans who remember the ring, no one else is going to remember a 15 year old snoozer of a football game. Or how ‘bout the 30-13 hosing the Cowboys gave the Bills. Or the 55-10 San Francisco win? I had to Wikipedia those last two to even use them as examples.

NASCAR is no different. I remember Burton going flag to flag at New Hampshire because I was there in the seat that I’ve sat in since 1993. How many of the old school fans remember what happened at that one New Hampshire race sixteen years ago? Unless they were huge Burton fans, or maybe season champ Bobby Labonte fans, I doubt many do. Or what about the Dover race I went to when I was a kid in ’91 when Harry Gant lapped the field? Sure, it’s easy to remember that Burton was the man at New Hampshire for a long string of years and Harry Gant was Mr. September, but the details fall by the wayside.

Does a baseball fan stop watching when a game is slow? Do football fans vow to never watch another game because nothing happens in the last quarter of garbage time in a huge win? That’s not how it works so I don’t see why it would work that way in NASCAR.

daytona can-am 2I am sympathetic to the NASCAR brass when this happens though. They’re trying to maintain a presence in the national sports psyche. The sport over built and got hit hard when the economy tanked. It’s not like it was back in the day when I was a kid and I didn’t know another soul growing up in Connecticut who even knew what NASCAR was, but it’s not our heyday either. NASCAR is in a tough spot. Around where I live in New England, I get people all the time asking me why I love NASCAR. One of the big things I always tell them is that the sport is like a traveling circus and a soap opera all in one. The more you know the ins and outs of the sport, the more fun it is to watch. When you know *why* a fuel mileage battle is tense or how a crew chief is able to chase adjustments or how something as simple as clouds moving in can change the track… when you know why these things affect the race, you can get more enjoyment out of what’s going on. You can see past the surface. But for someone flipping through the channels, how do you get them to stop long enough to get below the surface?

I could come up with suggestions, sure. Anyone can. But I don’t have the answers, otherwise I’d be working for NASCAR.

I do wish NASCAR wouldn’t throw down a kneejerk reaction and try to change the rules every time a race wasn’t an epic win though. Frankly, I think that’s short sighted. Let’s look at the season as a whole and as a whole, we are doing much better in terms of on track product. All the marketing gimmicks in the world can’t make up for a great product, that’s where we’ve got to start and that’s what we got.

I think that the fans with the knowledge can appreciate Truex’s win this past week for what it was, a race for the record books which may never be beaten again.

And that’s a good thing.

Shout Outs

In a race with a very distinct line between the haves and the have-nots, there are some noteworthy performances buried within the stat sheet.

newman at coke 600The first shout out goes to Ryan Newman. He didn’t run a flashy race, at no point ever did he get much in the way of TV time. Newman’s RCR car ran midpack almost the entire race, but he managed to sneak into a top ten finish at the very end of the day. It sounds like the most Ryan Newman race ever, and it kind of was. Races like that have been his MO for the last couple seasons. It’s important this week however, because heading into the summer, Newman is how within the Chase cutoff via points. That 10th place finish bumped Allmendinger out of the 16th points spot and Newman in. He’s tied on points with Blaney and only nine behind Jamie Mac. Newman keeps on churning out those quiet top tens and he can find his way into the post season. He came damn close to winning the whole championship that way two years ago.

biffle at coke 600I also want to toss out a Shout Out to Greg Biffle. The Biff, along with the whole of Roush Fenway Racing, is quietly becoming relevant again with some consistency. Biffle started well and then had a very Ryan Newman race after that coming home in 11th. I spent a lot of time thinking at the front end of this year that when Roush inevitably shook up his driver line up to help the team’s performance, that the Biff would be one of the casualties. He’s been bringing it back the last few races though. I strongly believe that NASCAR is better off with the whole RFR stable, with the Biff still as the leader, relevant and running well. This uptick in performance for the #16 team is a good thing.

I’d also like to drop a special Shout Out to whoever runs the Circle Sport-Levine twitter account. Banana and mustard sandwiches are for the win… maybe… I’ll stick with ham and cheese though.

mustard bananas

Pit Stall 13 Update

annett at coke 600This week, the glory of the 13th pit stall went to Michael Annett and the #46 HScott team. However, it was not a particularily great day for the team. Annett did not qualify well and barely finished any better in 36th, ten laps off the pace. His HScott teammate, Clint Boywer, did not perform much better, spending the day mired in the mid-20s. Now I am adding another sentence or two so I can have an excuse to make the picture big enough to see clearly at this point.

Charterless Update

  • 20th – #21 Ryan Blaney – The Wood Brothers are still getting into the swing of a full time schedule, but props for a decent enough finish in his first complete 600 (crashed out last year)
  • 35th – #98 Cole Whitt – He spent the whole night in the 30s on a night when attrition wasn’t going to help
  • 38th – #30 Josh Wise – Ctrl+C from Cole Whitt above.
  • 40th – #55 Reed Sorenson – Fell out of the race with only 200 laps under his belt

On to Pocono

So next week NASCAR heads north. Well, not “north” for real, but north to all the southerners. Pennsylvania doesn’t count as the north to anyone who actually lives up north.

It’s the first trip there this year and always down for a good show since it’s such a unique track. Kenseth won last time NASCAR went to Pocono and Truex won the race last June. So Truex wasn’t running a Toyota last year, but with the Gibbs Toyotas already dominating and Truex riding high after this latest win, I would not be surprised to see him go back to back.

The other big story line to watch is Kyle Busch. He was never really a factor this past week at Charlotte, but Pocono is the other track on the circuit that he has never won at. I did just talk about in the paragraph above that the Gibbs Toyotas are the team to beat at any and all tracks this year. Love him or hate him, Kyle Busch is driven to be the same conversation as Petty, Earnhardt, Gordon, and Johnson as Best Ever. He has his championship and he really wants to score that W at ever track.

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Martinsville Round Up

Short track racing!!

When NASCAR rolls into the oldest track on the tour, I always do a little happy dance. Even in the years when the rules package means the racing isn’t top notch everywhere else, Martinsville always puts on a show. Because aero doesn’t mean a damn thing on the paperclip.

NASCAR needs more short tracks. Anyone who watched today’s race would agree to that.

kyle wins martinsvilleThe race this week was way more exciting than the box score would have you think. Kyle Busch finished the weekend sweep, leading over 350 of the 500 laps. That lap stat there makes it seem like he ran away from the field, but there’s the beauty of short track racing, the leader is bumping and banging around on track just as much as everyone else. There were only eight cautions, which big chunks of green flag racing in between. The cool temps at the track meant that the concrete surface never really got any grip, so there was huge tire fall off during a run. I’m more than ok with this. It’s one of those things that makes for great racing.

I feel like I’ve been talking about tire fall off and tire issues almost every week. That’s typical of a place like this or at Atlanta, but the rubber was a big deal at Fontana too. Byproduct of the low aero. (Or the Martinsville no-aero). I really think that NASCAR fans are being seriously spoiled this year in terms of excellent races. Haven’t had a snoozer yet this year really. That’s why when I saw there were empty seats at Martinsville, I thought it was a damn shame. If it wasn’t seven states away, I’d go myself. It’s on my bucket list. There are few guarantees in NASCAR, but a good race at Martinsville is one of them.

This race was full of standout performances that will tell the real story of the race, so before we start calling out those stellar runs, how’d my predictions from last week do?

Pretty much wish I had gone to Vegas with those. Last week, I called early advantage to Kyle Busch. Which was a big duh. I actually didn’t realize though that prior to this weekend sweep, he had never won a trophy at Martinsville. Seems like such a natural fit for him. After checking off this track, Kyle Busch is down to just three on the circuit that he has left on his list, Charlotte, Pocono, and Kansas.

allmendinger at martinsvilleI also hit a home run with calling on Allmendinger to carry the momentum the #47 had been building through the start of the season. Top ten car all day and stormed to the front on the last restart to finish second. The JTG Daughtry team is seriously gelling right now. Yeah, early season gains don’t always last for the whole year, but I find their gains impressive because NASCAR opens the year on a wide variety of tracks. Good finishes at Fontana and Martinsville are two very different things but this little team did both. If they can make similar gains at the cookie cutter mile-and-a-half tracks, this team can be in the mix at the end of the year.

Shenanigans!

Eh, there weren’t much. That was really the one prediction that was a swing and a miss from the last round up post. The only real drama was Austin Dillon getting fired up on the radio. But that’s starting to be a regular thing as is crew chief Slugger Labbe telling him to breathe and get back to racing.

menard at martinsville 2Menard gave Dillon a shove at one point, maybe 2/3 through the race. They were both right around 10th. Lapped traffic. Menard had a run. Just one of those deals at a short track. But with no rubber sticking to the surface of the track, people were getting freight trained on the outside lane and Dillon lost some spots. They were beating and banging on each other for a while but they left it on the track as they should and were cool after the race.

The Worst Caution Ever

I can’t find video of this floating around anywhere yet, it might be too early (since I’m writing this on Sunday night instead of the usual Monday evening), but the worst caution ever came out at Martinsville today.

Sweet Lady Debris shows up from time to time in NASCAR, but maybe the TV cameras just can’t find it. The broadcasters have more important things to cover than scanning the track to maybe find a piece of something on the track. And the cynical among us decry the phantom cautions, but at least NASCAR has plausible deniability. “Just cause *you* didn’t see the debris, doesn’t mean anything.” It’s a good line. Easy to defend.

wise atlantaJosh Wise in the #30, one of those guys I really would love to see in top notch equipment someday, was running a few laps off the pace near Truex in the Furniture Row car. After almost a hundred laps on the tires, things were getting squirrely. Truex went underneath Wise but came up into him. The doorslam put Wise up into the marbles and the caution flew.

Except Wise didn’t hit anything. Or spin. Or even slide. He just went out of the racing groove.

After taking flak for not throwing a caution at the end of the Fontana Xfinity race before the break, someone jumped the gun way too fast here.

Rally Time

I said above that the story of the race is really some of the individual highlights. Let’s look at our finishing order. Edwards had 6th. Newman 10th. Logano 11th. Earnhardt 14th. Good to meh finishes for these drivers. Normally not anything to write home about.

But all four of them spent significant time a lap down.

Edwards started deep in the field and didn’t even crack the top twenty until almost midway. Earnhardt spun for the first caution on lap six and didn’t get it back until 313 for the Wise “caution.” (I’ll be the Tin Foil Hat Crowd loves that) Logano had the pole to start, but dropped like a rock after he chewed up his tires early in a run and had to claw his way back just for 11th. Newman also started and held on longer than Logano, but lost a lap and only got it back at the end.

All of these drivers put in a hell of a lot more effort than their finish would make you think. They showed their stuff out on the track. A rally from deep in the field is always more impressive at a short track. Yeah, there are more opportunities to get your lap back, but you can lose laps even quicker. All part of why short tracks put on the best show.

Shout Outs!

AJ Allmendinger! Yeah, I talked about him above, but how can I not talk about him again? This is a seriously impressive run for him in that car. Martinsville and the short tracks are good to the road racers. The extreme style of braking carries over for both types of racing. The Dinger is always one of the best when NASCAR turns left and right and with his team stepping up their game across the board, he got a chance to show off those braking skills today. He talked about how the little teams need to pounce on good days like this and he certainly did for his #47 crew.

vickers at martinsvilleThe next shout out goes to a guy who isn’t even going to race next week at Texas. Brian Vickers had another week as the fill in for Tony Stewart, but the races with Bass Pro Shops on the hood go to Ty Dillon. He has no clue what any of his racing plans are, although there is talk he may run Indy this year. Vickers started third and ran in the top 15 all day pulling off a seventh place finish for Stewart-Haas. Even going back to his Red Bull Racing days, I’ve always felt his medical issues gave him a raw deal. You can’t blame a team for needing to bank on consistent availability, but I’ve always liked seeing him out perform these part time expectations he’s been forced into.

All of Richard Childress Racing gets a shout out today. Yeah, the Neon Beard and Dillon got into it on the track, but all three cars finished in the top ten. RCR doesn’t have Rousch problems, but it’s been quite a long time for that team to pull that off. That team is going to break the winless drought, likely sooner rather than later, and there are days when it looks like it could be any of the three. Menard in particular needed a good run. He got out front and led laps. Stats guy on twitter said in over eight thousand laps run at the paperclip, it was the first time he ran any of them out front. First laps lead on the year for Menard. The #27 had some bad hands dealt already this season, the ten point penalty for the fender whatevers, the blown tire for the 38th place finish a couple weeks ago, and for a driver who pointed into the Chase, it’s hard to soak up too many bad days like that.

Pit Stall 13 Update

larson bumperThe Pit Stall 13 Update doubles as a shout out this week! Kyle Larson had the magic pit stall this week and as a dirt racer, you’d think short tracks would be his bag, but none of his other four starts at Martinsville resulted in a finish worth calling home about. Larson’s Target car that my kid loves so much had a middling place on the starting grid. He broke into the top ten before a hundred laps were up and never left it.

Larson came home in third place and is leading the Pit Stall 13 standings now.

He’s on the upswing all together this season. I don’t like the term “sophomore slump” at all really, and I think Larson was victim of last year’s crap aero package more than most drivers. He’s improving now in year three though and I think he’ll get his breakout win soon.

Charterless Update

  • 19th – #21 Ryan Blaney – The rookie ran midpack all day, stayed out of trouble, and finished on the lead lap. A+ day for a rookie at this track
  • 30th – #98 Cole Whitt – Finished, but a number of laps off the pace. With the attrition rate lower than usual for short track racing, this was all that just surviving could get
  • 37th – #55 Reed Sorensen – Huh? That’s right, we actually had a full field now that we’re back on the East Coast. It was an extra car for Premium and I had to look that up to even figure out who had that number now.
  • 38th – #30 Josh Wise – Already talked about the Worst Caution Ever, but the car’s engine conked out later on in the race.

Texas Up Next

Big fast track coming up on the schedule next before more short tracking. Expect a lot of references to that giant ass TV screen they have at Texas Motor Speedway cause the culture of that state obsesses with largeness.

Now that we’re settling into the season, expect to see the usual faces up front. Specifically, I think the guys who ran well at Fontana will run well at Texas. RCR historically did well at high horsepower tracks, so I’d like to see them carry the momentum from today, even if the tracks couldn’t be any more different.

Atlanta Round Up

It’s round two of the NASCAR season and we finally get a better picture of how the season is going to go.

Or not.

The Daytona 500 has the prestige but as a plate track, we only get a sense of who’s going to be good on a plate track. Whatever. Atlanta is a mile and a half, the track type making up the bulk of the schedule.

Except Atlanta’s surface was last paved in 1997. That’s ancient by NASCAR standards. With Gordon retired, no one left has raced on the track without that pavement on it. So Atlanta is like driving on sandpaper. Tires, tires, and tires were everyone’s concern heading into this race. Lower downforce and massive tire drop off means Atlanta is a 180 from Daytona.

This is a track that favors the drivers.

This race was old school.

johnson wins atlantaJimmie Johnson won the Folds of Honor Quik Tip 500 at Atlanta. Another sponsor I have no idea what the hell they are. I actually thought it was Fields of Honor for most of the weekend.

Not a big surprise that he did well and won the race. As much as I maintain that his five years of championships were a great personal achievement that may not have been good for the competition level of the sport at a time when NASCAR needed more competition, no one can deny he isn’t one of the all time greats. As much as we may want to. Johnson tied Dale Earnhardt Sr’s mark of 76 wins on the all time list. Impressive by any measure you can think of in any era of the sport.

menard post atlantaRemember a second ago I said how this Atlanta race was old school. I mean that in the best way. There were only two caution flags, plus a lase second wreck. This race was all about the drivers out wheeling each other and the crew chiefs out smarting each other. Which the #48 team did both to score the win. Only twelve guys finished on the lead lap, and there were that many only because one of the cautions flew with three laps to go. Much of the race had less than ten. But since it wasn’t a wreck fest, the box score had everyone running at the end. Not something we see too much of anymore. The drivers were slipping and sliding all over the track. They were bumping around the old pavement. They were covered in grit and grime and chunks of rubber (bless you 50″ plasma purchased before the children). It was wonderful.

Most of the drivers I pegged as having a good race ahead of them did. Johnson. The Busch brothers. Keselowski, although his race was quietly good. Kahne… whoops. Missed that one. He’s becoming the Danica off Hendrick Racing. The biggest surprise in the results was Larson. His car never got it together and was a non factor the whole race. Without any cautions until the race was half over, the #42 team never had a chance to work on the car and finished three laps off the pace.

I absolutely loved this race and was surprised that I saw the Let’s Never Change Cadre complaining on twitter. I guess the thing that really never changes about the Let’s Never Change Cadre is that they’ll always find some reason to hate on any race Dale Jr doesn’t win. We’ll be over there enjoying NASCAR without you.

Crew forgets to tell Kenseth about black flag

Whoops! This was a big one. Kenseth was running very well up front when NASCAR pegged them with a pit road penalty. It was the gas man who dropped an adjustment wrench on the back decklid of the car for the tire carrier to pick up and do his adjustment thing with. [Buzz sound] Fail. Rules say gas guys can’t do anything but fuel the car. This is a safety thing. Gas fires still happen. Brendan Gaughan’s pit crew at a Richmond Xfinity race last year. Thing is, Kenseth’s crew chief, Jason Radcliff, argued that the gas can wasn’t engaged yet and that queuing up a wrench like that was standard practice. And while he was arguing with NASCAR, no one told Kenseth about the black flag. Which then turned into a black flag with white X. I didn’t even realize that was a thing, that’s how often that one drops. Someone on twitter said it happened to Robby Gordon at a Montreal Xfinity race a few years ago. I certainly don’t remember it happening in Cup. NASCAR stopped scoring Kenseth, so from their point of view, that lap after the black-white-X flag dropped, just didn’t count. Added to losing a lap from a pass through peanalty and Kenseth was down two. One was survivable. A couple well time cautions and all’s well. But two? Eh, not so much. He never got either back and finished 19th.

Kenseth was pissed and I don’t blame him. I haven’t seen a screw up that bad … well… since Kenseth T-boned Logano just for kicks.

Truex was … displeased with Regan Smith

truex flips off regan smith at atlantaSo I wasn’t really sure what caused this. It certainly wasn’t something caught by the TV broadcast. Regan Smith was a few laps down in mid race and Truex was among the front runners (as he was the whole race). I guess Truex figured the #7 held him up more than he needed to. Atlanta is a wide track with room to get out of each others way, but I guess if your car is handling like a dump truck on ice there’s not much you can do. Whatever the case, the Fox broadcasters had Truex’s in car camera rolling while Mike Joy, Jeff Gordon and DW were talking about him and whoops! Middle finger time! I didn’t even catch it at first. My dad was all “Did that just happen???” and I had to use the magic of the DVR to get that nice little screen cap you see to the left.

We’ll see if anything happens on Penalty Tuesday or if everyone tries to ignore it. Which is often the best tactic since the pictures didn’t make the rounds too much.

Bonus question… how the hell would Regan Smith even be able to see the bird? It’s not like Truex went full Norm Benning with the finger out the window.

Pit Stall 13 Update

newman pits at atlantaRyan Newman was the recipient of the magical Pit Stall number 13. This is the first true pit stall 13 of the year, since Daytona has 12A instead. How’d he do with the magic behind him?

Well, he ran better than his 24th place finish would have you think. Newman’s #31 RCR team stayed on the lead lap throughout the whole day when the lead lap cars dwindled down to a low of eight. But at the end of the race when everyone was trying to stretch their tires to the end, the Caterpillar Chevy blew the left rear. Newman didn’t hit anything or anyone but the tire shredded to hell and hosed up his car pretty bad and killed his good finish.

Charterless Update

  • 25th – #21 Blaney, ran decent, lost laps with a loose wheel though
  • 37th – #98 Whitt, managed to lead a lap during early green flag pit stops
  • 39th – #30 Wise, first qualified race for that team, finished last

wise atlantaWait, Wise finished last in 39th? Yup. NASCAR ran without a full field. Happened at Kentucky a couple years ago. Before that, it’s going back to the epic 2001 Thanksgiving at Loudon (Robby Gordon for the win!). The last time NASCAR ran a race with less than 40 was in the mid 90s at North Wilksboro because that track didn’t have enough pit stalls. This is part of the mixed bag that comes with the charters that we’re going to have to watch. The Daytona 500 only have 44 entries which was the least in decades. NASCAR has lost a lot of teams this year, and not just among the part timers. MWR is completely gone now. Levine and Circle Sport merged. Team Xtreme dropped off the face of the earth a couple races after having their car stolen last year. Hillman’s #40 missed a charter, exists only as a sort of extension of Premium. Phil Parsons Racing, famous for Wise’s Dogecar, got bought out by Premium last year and then condensed down to one car, with the aforementioned Hillman assets. BK Racing dropped one full time team. Front Row did the same. Tommy Baldwin did a couple years ago. That’s eight teams which aren’t around anymore from Daytona 2015, ten if you go back a couple years.

This is the reality of what NASCAR has now. ‘Course, we still got a great race this week, but I still feel that the long term health of the sport can be represented by the little teams and how they’re surviving. Two races into the season is not enough to judge the whole charter system by. I think the real test for the system is going to come when someone wants to expand and get into the guaranteed show. That might be a ways off though.

Almirola’s Fiery Wreck

almirola wrecks atlantaI had this picture ready to go and needed to use it. Nothing more. Carry on with your day.